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Using Prusa Enclosure in cold room  

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Aryser
(@aryser)
Active Member
Using Prusa Enclosure in cold room

My printer is in a cold room. In the winter I have to heat before printing a few degrees.
Can Prusa Enclosure help?
Then I could heat only the enclosure instead of the cellar room!
Would the printer heat the inside of  the Enclosure? How much?

Best Answer by Diem:

"minTemp“ is there to prevent you trying to print when the part is very likely to fail due to warping.  Your enclosure, once warmed, will protect you from this. 

If you want to use the printer to prewarm the enclosure you will need to kickstart it.  Blow hot air into the enclosure for a few seconds, a hairdryer will do, shut the door and set the printer to preheat for ten minutes before starting to print.

Cheerio,

Posted : 03/10/2022 7:37 pm
Razor
(@razor)
Estimable Member
RE: Using Prusa Enclosure in cold room

An enclosure would definitely help with some materials. I think we need to know a few more things though about the room. Some immediate questions come to mind;

  • Define “cold”. Is it 50ºF, 60ºF, 70ºF?
  • What material are you using?
  • Is there a draft in the room?

Depending on your answers it may help to preheat the enclosure before running prints.

Posted : 03/10/2022 8:04 pm
jsw
 jsw
(@jsw)
Famed Member
RE:

Yes, the printer most definitely heats the enclosure (I have the 3d Upfitters enclosure, not the Prusa), but I have come to believe that the main advantage of it is the isolated draft-free environment and not the increased temperature that makes it effective in improving print quality.

If I were to install a heater in an enclosure, I would go with something that would heat by convection and/or radiation, not by blown air.  You want the minimum of airflow in the enclosure.  Something like incandescent lamps or maybe a power resistor appropriately placed may do the trick.  I don't know how effective that might be, but that would be what I would try if I needed to warm an enclosure.

Here is my report on the enclosure: https://forum.prusa3d.com/forum/original-prusa-i3-mk3s-mk3-user-mods-octoprint-enclosures-nozzles/product-report-3d-upfitters-mk3s-mmu2s-acrylic-enclosure/#post-257689

Posted : 03/10/2022 8:28 pm
Aryser
(@aryser)
Active Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Using Prusa Enclosure in cold room
  • mintemp is for Prusa <15°C but I can print with about 13°C. The room gets 10°C.
  • there is no draft in the room.
  • I print most time PETG.
Posted : 03/10/2022 9:08 pm
Razor
(@razor)
Estimable Member
RE: Using Prusa Enclosure in cold room

I would put that as cold.
An enclosure would definitely help. You may have to preheat the chamber for 5 minutes or so when it gets really cold. And not knowing what the temperature is like in the summer, you may need to open the doors on it if the room gets similarly warm.

 

Posted : 04/10/2022 2:32 am
Aryser
(@aryser)
Active Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Using Prusa Enclosure in cold room

It would be nice to use the printer to preheat the enclosure.
However, I assume the "minTemp“ function" of the Prusa printer will prevent from doing this.

Posted : 04/10/2022 6:10 am
Diem
 Diem
(@diem)
Famed Member

"minTemp“ is there to prevent you trying to print when the part is very likely to fail due to warping.  Your enclosure, once warmed, will protect you from this. 

If you want to use the printer to prewarm the enclosure you will need to kickstart it.  Blow hot air into the enclosure for a few seconds, a hairdryer will do, shut the door and set the printer to preheat for ten minutes before starting to print.

Cheerio,

Posted : 04/10/2022 9:19 am
Neophyl
(@neophyl)
Famed Member
RE: Using Prusa Enclosure in cold room

My favourite method is the cup of coffee.  I generally need a hot drink on a cold day anyway.  Remove your print sheet and stick a cup of something hot on your bed for a few minutes.  Move the extruder out of the way before you do so though lol.  Don't want to steam it up.

The min temp is not there as a warping protection though, its there as protection from a broken thermistor.  Personally I think this area of the firmware could be improved, say to allow 60 seconds of heating and see if the measured temp goes up in that time, if not then error out, if it goes up then carry on with the printing warmup process.

Posted : 04/10/2022 9:39 am
Diem
 Diem
(@diem)
Famed Member

The min temp is not there as a warping protection though, its there as protection from a broken thermistor.

It may even be both.  I know that if you don't give it enough time parts are likely to warp and pop off...

I hope you take your coffee without sugar, there's nothing stickier to clear from electronics than syrupy spills and rings.

Cheerio,

Posted : 04/10/2022 9:54 am
Razor
(@razor)
Estimable Member
RE: Using Prusa Enclosure in cold room

I agree with @Diem. The trick with the hair dryer should work well. As for putting a coffee or another warm beverage in there, not so much. I see an eventual buildup of “gunk” whether it be from sugars, milk fats, or something else. And God help you if you accidentally knock it over in there.

Full disclosure, I have problems with drinks even when they are out in the open. 😄

Posted : 04/10/2022 2:02 pm
Neophyl
(@neophyl)
Famed Member
RE: Using Prusa Enclosure in cold room

Never had a problem with a hot drink 🙂  Its Joan's recommended method too, might just be a British thing lol.  

Posted : 04/10/2022 2:36 pm
Razor liked
Aryser
(@aryser)
Active Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Using Prusa Enclosure in cold room

Thank you all, specially Diem

I will try (in winter) to print in the enclosure. I will deblock the Prusa printer with a hairdryer and use after the preheat function.

This will be a  easy solution without additional technic features and installations.

I will give final feedback in a few  months!

Posted : 05/10/2022 7:22 pm
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