Should not Print with Hard Material nozzle over 240c from E3D??
 
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Should not Print with Hard Material nozzle over 240c from E3D??  

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muo
 muo
(@muo)
Estimable Member
Should not Print with Hard Material nozzle over 240c from E3D??

So i don't know how valid this is, but this is a surprise to me if true, according to what E3d is saying

https://e3d-online.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/4415901401489-V6-Maximum-Temperature-Ratings

on the link above it says

"Hardened steel nozzles are not suitable for use with aluminum blocks above 240°C"
  • have you had any issues with Printing above 240c with hard nozzle and aluminum blocks block, with prusa bought parts or e3d bought parts?

that being said what are you thoughts on:

  • Does this mean any hard material like harden steal/tungsten carbide etc....will cause issues if used with a aluminum block to print above 240c?
    1. I have had issues in the past almost 100% of the time when switching to hard nozzle, where Nozzle would leak when using  hard steal and tungsten carbide nozzles with aluminum blockbut
      one time it worked for months without leaks might have been a Prusa bough hard nozzle and block 
    2. but had 100% success rate when switching to Brass nozzle which was odd since it almost always failed with hard nozzle
  • What ISSUES will printing above 240 cause with a aluminum block and Harder material nozzle you think?
  • DOES That Warning Apply to only some heat blocks/nozzles or all made by E3d, as an i believe Prusa gets it aluminum heat blocks and harden steal nozzles from E3D so does this warning apply to Prusa also or just for aluminum block/harden nozzle from E3D directly or Both from prusa and E3D?
This topic was modified 2 months ago 3 times by muo
Posted : 25/09/2022 6:31 am
karl-herbert
(@karl-herbert)
Illustrious Member
RE: Should not Print with Hard Material nozzle over 240c from E3D??

"Hardened steel nozzles are not suitable for use with aluminum blocks above 240°C"

Depending on grade of steel, annealing temperatures are in the range between 200 and 360 degrees C. If this temperature is exceeded, the steel loses hardness. I think with your nozzle you can print at 260-280 degrees without hesitation, since the reduction in hardness is not too dramatic.

I have never had a problem with the combination of hardened steel nozzle and aluminum block at temperatures above 240 degrees.

For carbon alloy filament, however, I personally prefer to use a tungsten carbide nozzle with a nickel-plated copper block. With this combination, temperatures above 300 degrees C. are no problem (printing CarbonPEEK).

wbr,

Karl

Statt zu klagen, dass wir nicht alles haben, was wir wollen, sollten wir lieber dankbar sein, dass wir nicht alles bekommen, was wir verdienen.

Posted : 25/09/2022 3:06 pm
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