filling a fdm printed model with resin/liquid in gyroid pattern
 
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frankbartoli
(@frankbartoli)
Active Member
filling a fdm printed model with resin/liquid in gyroid pattern

Dear all,

I read in the guide's chapter infilling for gyroid pattern is possible to fill inside the model with resin or another liquid (I supposed with the use of a syringe).

Do you know the procedure and type of resin/liquid used for this threatment?

Thanks

Franz

Posted : 05/01/2024 12:30 pm
troyfields
(@troyfields)
Member
RE:

Hello, here's a general procedure you can follow:

1. Prepare the Model: Ensure that your FDM printed model is clean and free from any debris or excess filament. Smooth out any rough surfaces if desired.

2. Select the Resin/Liquid: The choice of resin or liquid will depend on your specific requirements and desired outcome. Here are a few options to consider:

a. Epoxy Resin: Epoxy resins are commonly used for filling voids in 3D printed models. They provide good strength and durability.

b. UV-Curable Resin: UV-curable resins, used in SLA or DLP 3D printers, can also be used for filling. These resins cure when exposed to UV light.

c. Silicone or Polyurethane Casting Resin: These resins are flexible and can be used if you want the filled areas to have some elasticity.It's important to note that different resins have different handling and curing requirements, so follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer.

3. Prepare the Resin/Liquid: Mix or prepare the resin or liquid according to the manufacturer's instructions. Ensure that it is well-mixed and ready for use.

4. Injection Process: To fill the model, you can use a syringe or a similar tool with a fine needle or nozzle. Here's a step-by-step process:

a. Identify the entry points: Determine where you want to inject the resin/liquid into the model. These entry points should be strategically placed to allow the resin to flow through the gyroid pattern.

b. Create access holes: Using a small drill or similar tool, carefully create small access holes in the model's outer surface at the identified entry points. Ensure the holes are large enough for the needle or nozzle to fit.

c. Inject the resin/liquid: Insert the syringe or nozzle into the access hole and gently inject the resin/liquid into the model. Apply gradual pressure and monitor the resin flow. Ensure that it spreads evenly throughout the gyroid pattern.

d. Release excess air: As you inject the resin/liquid, air bubbles may get trapped. Tap or gently vibrate the model to encourage the release of air bubbles and allow the resin/liquid to fill the voids completely.

e. Seal the access holes: Once the filling process is complete, seal the access holes using an appropriate material, such as epoxy putty or a 3D printed plug.

5. Curing and Finishing: Follow the resin manufacturer's instructions for curing the filled model. This may involve exposing the resin to UV light or allowing it to cure over time. After curing, you can remove any excess resin, sand or smooth the surface, and finish the model as desired.

This post was modified 3 months ago 2 times by troyfields
uno online
Posted : 17/01/2024 7:25 am
Robin_13
(@robin_13)
Reputable Member
RE: filling a fdm printed model with resin/liquid in gyroid pattern

An interesting question.  Not sure why but that is not he issue.

I have had to do some weird things in my job and one of them was fill things with epoxy.  Some of fill was very fine and couldn't have any air.  Much of the work was done under vacuum.

As troyfields said, air can/will be a problem.  We had to design vent holes in our projects to allow air to escape or to connect vacuum lines to.  To resolve some of the air issues, you may want to remove as many bubbles as possible with a vacuum system some way.  A syringe can create a vacuum to help remove bubble by plugging the end once its full and then pull the handle back.  I bought a automotive vacuum line tester and use that in some projects.

You want what you are filling with, to be as low viscosity as possible.  In some cases, you can thin the material down with various chemicals.  I just found out that JB Weld clear epoxy can be thinned with Acetone.   I have not tried it yet but it is something that is on my TO-DO list.

If you are designing the models, you may want to design hollow spots inside to be filled instead of fill material.  Print with minimal fill material.  Fewer obstructions to make filling harder.

Another interesting thing that can happen, if you mix large enough quantities of epoxy, you can get into a thermal runaway where the temperature of the epoxy can increase at a rapid rate and to a very high temperature.  It happened when mixing about 1l of epoxy.  The epoxy got so hot it melted the plastic container holding it but cured so fast that nothing spilled out.  I have also had this happen when pouring epoxy and it hardened while pouring to even hold the container in mid air.

Posted : 20/01/2024 7:15 am
frankbartoli
(@frankbartoli)
Active Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: filling a fdm printed model with resin/liquid in gyroid pattern

Thanks you guys,

So I could use the waste of resin from sl1s printings and cure the model filled placing it under the sun for hours...

Do you have some specific epoxy resin and silicone to suggest me?

Thanks

FB

Posted : 20/01/2024 8:04 am
JP Guitars
(@jp-guitars)
Estimable Member
RE: filling a fdm printed model with resin/liquid in gyroid pattern

I'm not into FDM so this may be a daft comment...

If you are going to fill it with waste fdm resin, would it not achieve the same result and be less effort to do a 100% fill in the first place?

Posted : 20/01/2024 8:36 am
Robin_13
(@robin_13)
Reputable Member
RE: filling a fdm printed model with resin/liquid in gyroid pattern

It would depend on what you want to do and what quantities.  Where I worked, we purchased 8 or more litres of epoxy at a time as I could use 2 or more litres in a week.  Search for low viscosity epoxies and resins if you want to inject with a needle.  The ones we used, you chose the resin and hardener depending on your requirements and curing times.  Ours was a 24 hour cure at 22 degrees.  If heated, it could cure in minutes.  Shelf life could be extended by heating the unmixed epoxy.   Lots of companies make epoxy that will meet your needs.

 

Posted : 20/01/2024 8:39 am
frankbartoli
(@frankbartoli)
Active Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: filling a fdm printed model with resin/liquid in gyroid pattern

You should fill 100% every layers and could be very tedious for time of printing. Furthermore with for example flex resin or silicone could be possible to fill while keeping flexibility.

Posted : 20/01/2024 8:41 am
Robin_13
(@robin_13)
Reputable Member
RE: filling a fdm printed model with resin/liquid in gyroid pattern

I don't know your reasons for wanting solid objects.  In most cases, I cannot see a reason for solid objects that i print.  I have just drawn up and made a test print for some flexible tests on based on thickness.

Some materials are flexible in thinner layers but can be very hard when in large solids.

I would do testing with wall thicknesses and infill to see if you really need to fill the printed object.  Adding the cost of your fill material could make a small print expensive.

Not sure if you have used a resin printer yet but at work we have a a few of them.  After trying the sunshine curing method, a UV boxes were purchased for each printer.  It could take days to get some items fully cured in the sun.  Also, you have to look at how UV may damage your printed part or if it can even get far enough into your object to cure the resin.

If time is an issue, epoxy is probably the fastest though low viscosity epoxies do take longer to cure at room temperature.

I can see the use for filling small objects to add strength.

This is an interesting idea.

Posted : 20/01/2024 9:22 pm
cjameshuff
(@cjameshuff)
Eminent Member
RE: filling a fdm printed model with resin/liquid in gyroid pattern

I would really not recommend using UV resin. It's specifically meant to cure in thin layers, without the entire vat turning into a block of resin over the course of thousands of exposures from an intense UV source. It will likely not cure all the way through, and may crack and leak later.

Posted : 21/01/2024 11:44 pm
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