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Heating the Prusa enclosure  

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Bart
 Bart
(@bart)
Active Member
Heating the Prusa enclosure

Hi,

 

i am considering to get myself a Prusa enclosure. I am looking for a way to monitor and influence the temperature in the enclosure. I read on the Prusa site that this feature is being worked on. How did you guys solve this already?

My current setup (Ikea lack) is in my garage where the temperatures in late fall to early  spring, are too low for the printer to even start ("Temp error").  I cannot move the printer to a warmer environment, so i am looking for a way to heat the enclosure.

I have been looking for solutions (transform an egg incubator, perhaps a heatmat for a terrarium, a carheater(i think too dangerous because of my plastic enclosure  windows) etc).

Did any of you solve this problem for your enclosure?

Bart

Posted : 21/09/2022 10:56 am
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

I have never needed to do so even when my shop is 0 degrees C.  

--------------------
Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog

Posted : 21/09/2022 11:26 pm
jsw
 jsw
(@jsw)
Famed Member
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

Not the Prusa enclosure, but I use a Raspberry Pi Zero and a junk box temp/humid sensor to monitor, and it is set up to control the fan, but I seldom use that feature at all.

Posted : 22/09/2022 12:01 am
Bart
 Bart
(@bart)
Active Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

 

Posted by: @cwbullet

I have never needed to do so even when my shop is 0 degrees C.  

In the article on the subject it states that the Min Temp (Bed) error for my printer (MK3S) starts at 10 degrees celcius. My printer protests like it is supposed to. That's why i need heat: the temp error blocks operation.

Posted : 22/09/2022 7:06 am
Bart
 Bart
(@bart)
Active Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

Hi JSW,

 

thank you for sharing! That is looking very well!! What kind of  display are you using?

Is the fan equipped with a heating element? Or is it used to blow in air from the room in wich the enclosure is situated?

My enclosure is in a room that as a temp <10 degrees celcius; so that would not be an option for me...

I fear that using a car heater( fan with heating element) will prove to be too much (plastic melts etc). So i am looking for someone who has dealt with this problem...

Posted by: @jsw

Not the Prusa enclosure, but I use a Raspberry Pi Zero and a junk box temp/humid sensor to monitor, and it is set up to control the fan, but I seldom use that feature at all.

 

Posted : 22/09/2022 7:21 am
jsw
 jsw
(@jsw)
Famed Member
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

The display would be the Inky Phat from Pimoroni.  I happened to have one on hand when I put the thing together.  The frame is the front part of a case from another project using the Pi Zero and the Phat.

It's the always-on paper-white type of display.

https://shop.pimoroni.com/products/inky-phat

There is a similar newer display from Waveshare which is about the same size as well.

When I started out, I intended to have a fully closed-loop system, with the Pi turning the fan on and off to hold the temp between two control points.  That did not work as well as expected in real life, even though the initial tests with a heat gun were successful.  The fan in the enclosure (3d Upfitters) is not strong enough to significantly lower the temperature below the high control point in many cases, and to put in a more powerful fan would obviously increase the turbulent (and even laminar) flow in the enclosure, which I do not want.

I now use it only as a monitor, even though it will hold the fan off at print start-up until the lower control point is reached.

The improvement of ABS prints was significant when I added the enclosure, so I am leaving things as is for now.

Posted : 22/09/2022 9:34 am
Bart
 Bart
(@bart)
Active Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

What a great idea! Have you thought of the option to open the doors (eg by MG90s or a lineair actuator) slighty to let heat escape?

That is one side of my Enclosure problem (coloing down in the summer). Now the heating still remains...

Posted : 22/09/2022 9:45 am
TheLivingBubba
(@thelivingbubba)
Active Member
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

I haven't done it , but was wondering about it earlier and watched this video.

Might be an option to look at.

Posted : 22/09/2022 10:47 am
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

 

Posted by: @jsw

When I started out, I intended to have a fully closed-loop system, with the Pi turning the fan on and off to hold the temp between two control points.  That did not work as well as expected in real life, even though the initial tests with a heat gun were successful.  The fan in the enclosure (3d Upfitters) is not strong enough to significantly lower the temperature below the high control point in many cases, and to put in a more powerful fan would obviously increase the turbulent (and even laminar) flow in the enclosure, which I do not want.

I had the same experience.  I never found fans to be useful and in fact, they are often harmful to print quality.  

--------------------
Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog

Posted : 22/09/2022 10:51 am
Bart
 Bart
(@bart)
Active Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

Wouldn't this kind of heat be too much/too agressive? The carheater will send heat inside of (i think-don't know) about 60-70 degrees celcius. That could hurt the plastics on my printer and in my enclosure. I'ld rather have a heatsource i can manage. A heatsource i could tell to only send heat of (say) 21 degrees. Not max heat(eg 60-70 degrees celcius) to heat up a room as fast as possible.

Or am i too cautious and would this carheaterconstruction work perfectly?

Posted by: @thelivingbubba

I haven't done it , but was wondering about it earlier and watched this video.

Might be an option to look at.

 

Posted : 22/09/2022 2:28 pm
jsw
 jsw
(@jsw)
Famed Member
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

My impression is that the temperature consistency and the lack of turbulent airflow is more important for successful ABS/ASA prints than the value of the air temperature in and of itself.

Before I got the enclosure, I found the draft shield option to be quite effective.

Posted : 22/09/2022 9:34 pm
Thejiral
(@thejiral)
Reputable Member
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

In my Voron I do have a tiny bit of airflow (don't know how turbulent it is, it is just there to apply a very weak underpressure to  keep fumes in, not to move much air) but enclosure temperatures are at 50-60°C. ABS prints wonderfully in there, even if I ramp up the part cooling fan. 

I think the closer you get to 90°C in the enclosure the more you can do whatever you like and get great ABS prints with good layer adhesion and basically no warping. 50°C is already a good start too and that temperature is much more achievable than 90°C for sure. If the enclosure is rather around 25-35°C however, a draft shield will be most likely very useful as well as keeping part cooling to an absolut minimum. 

Mk3s MMU2s, Voron 0.1

Posted : 23/09/2022 10:17 am
Bart
 Bart
(@bart)
Active Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

So if i understand correct: the closer the temp gets to 90 degrees celcius, a draft will become less of a problem?

Posted by: @thejiral

In my Voron I do have a tiny bit of airflow (don't know how turbulent it is, it is just there to apply a very weak underpressure to  keep fumes in, not to move much air) but enclosure temperatures are at 50-60°C. ABS prints wonderfully in there, even if I ramp up the part cooling fan. 

I think the closer you get to 90°C in the enclosure the more you can do whatever you like and get great ABS prints with good layer adhesion and basically no warping. 50°C is already a good start too and that temperature is much more achievable than 90°C for sure. If the enclosure is rather around 25-35°C however, a draft shield will be most likely very useful as well as keeping part cooling to an absolut minimum. 

 

Posted : 23/09/2022 11:47 am
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

You do not need to get to 90C.  Quality is great at 40 C.  

Posted by: @bart

So if i understand correct: the closer the temp gets to 90 degrees celcius, a draft will become less of a problem?

Posted by: @thejiral

In my Voron I do have a tiny bit of airflow (don't know how turbulent it is, it is just there to apply a very weak underpressure to  keep fumes in, not to move much air) but enclosure temperatures are at 50-60°C. ABS prints wonderfully in there, even if I ramp up the part cooling fan. 

I think the closer you get to 90°C in the enclosure the more you can do whatever you like and get great ABS prints with good layer adhesion and basically no warping. 50°C is already a good start too and that temperature is much more achievable than 90°C for sure. If the enclosure is rather around 25-35°C however, a draft shield will be most likely very useful as well as keeping part cooling to an absolut minimum. 

 

 

--------------------
Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog

Posted : 23/09/2022 11:54 am
Thejiral
(@thejiral)
Reputable Member
RE:

90°C is basically not feasible with a Prusa. It is what industrial grade FDM printers specialized for ABS are doing. At that temperature you also don't need a heated bed anymore. This in turn creates a very homogoneous temperature environment and also abolishes heat bed related warping too.

It is not necessary for reasonably sized high quality ABS prints to operate at such high temperatures however. I don't know what the minimum enclosure temp is where you start to get consistently good results. IMHO it is a gradient where things consistantly improve. I myself have experience with 50-60°C and there it works already very well. Already at 50° air movement isn't such a big deal anymore and one can in fact use quite a bit of part cooling harming layer adhesion significantly, at 90°C drafts would not matter at all.

I am pretty sure that at 40°C one can print ABS quite decently already as well, as cwbullet mentioned but I personally would be more careful there with part cooling then.

This post was modified 4 days ago 2 times by Thejiral

Mk3s MMU2s, Voron 0.1

Posted : 23/09/2022 12:55 pm
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
RE: Heating the Prusa enclosure

I have found that consistent bed temp, limiting drafts, and temps at 35-40C are sufficient to limit warping and maximize quality with ABS, PC, PC Blend, ASA, and Nylon.  I also tend to give my print bed a light spray with hair spray (Aquanet).  

--------------------
Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog

Posted : 23/09/2022 1:23 pm
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