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jjisnow
(@jjisnow)
New Member
Texture Feature

I was wondering if PrusaSlicer already had a texture feature or was planning as ideamaker has just come out with something that looks pretty good.

https://profound3d.com/blogs/news/raise3d-ideamaker-4-1-0-includes-texture-feature

 

Posted : 27/04/2021 2:57 pm
ogmios
(@ogmios)
New Member
RE: Texture Feature

I second that. Would love to see this available.

Posted : 11/07/2021 10:11 pm
Swiss_Cheese
(@swiss_cheese)
Noble Member
RE: Texture Feature

you can already do this in almost any 3d program, it's really not needed for slicing that's a gimmick that Ideamaker has added.

look in your 3d program of choice for displacement, or bump maps or normal's mapping. all of these are basically the same feature it's been available for many years and can be baked into your 3d models before export.

 

of course if you don't have a 3d program of choice you can always just download Ideamaker for free

 

Good luck, have fun

 

Swiss_Cheese

The Filament Whisperer

Posted : 11/07/2021 11:27 pm
jsw
 jsw
(@jsw)
Noble Member
RE: Texture Feature

The Cura slicer has a 'fuzzy skin' option which approaches this.  I've used it with attractive results.  It is not identical to, but compliments the pattern of the textured sheet very well.

Posted : 13/07/2021 8:09 am
Area51
(@area51)
RE: Texture Feature

The upcoming PrusaSlicer 2.4.0 also has an experimental "Fuzzy Skin" option under "Layers and Perimeters" in expert mode.

Very interesting surface effect.

This post was modified 12 months ago by Area51

Have a look at my models on Printables.com 😉

Posted : 14/07/2021 12:29 am
ogmios
(@ogmios)
New Member
RE: Texture Feature

@area51

SWEET!!! 🙂

Posted : 14/07/2021 12:45 am
towlerg
(@towlerg)
Noble Member
RE: Texture Feature
Posted by: @swiss_cheese

you can already do this in almost any 3d program, it's really not needed for slicing that's a gimmick that Ideamaker has added.

look in your 3d program of choice for displacement, or bump maps or normal's mapping. all of these are basically the same feature it's been available for many years and can be baked into your 3d models before export.

 

of course if you don't have a 3d program of choice you can always just download Ideamaker for free

 

Good luck, have fun

 

Swiss_Cheese

Absolutely agree with Swiss, this is not a slicer feature but a 3d design function.

Posted : 14/07/2021 10:30 am
jsw
 jsw
(@jsw)
Noble Member
RE: Texture Feature

The face brick texture on the building below was done with a 'negative' model file having the texture, which was then subtracted from (cut from) the model pieces as the final drafting step.  I sure thought I had a photo handy of the wind turbine base showing the 'fuzzy' skin, but apparently I don't.  😉

 

Posted : 14/07/2021 10:42 am
Netfool
(@netfool)
Active Member
RE: Texture Feature

OK, I agree that the slicer is the wrong place to apply texture.  However, the probability that primary school kids would be able to master Blender or Maya or any of the advanced CAD programs with surface displacement tools is somewhere south of zero.    I would be wonderful if someone could build a post-processing program that would paing texture on STLs coming out of TinkerCAD or OpenSCAD.  Both of those are usable by beginners.

(OpenSCAD does have a surface() function that will map a greyscale image onto the surface of a block, but you can't apply it to anything other than a rectangle the size of the image.  ....with little control over the z-axis size of the box.  I haven't figured out a real use for it yet.)   

Posted : 28/11/2021 8:00 pm
Swiss_Cheese
(@swiss_cheese)
Noble Member

@netfool

 

That would Be wonderfool, for the youngsters. (Please excuse my pun 😉 ) However you don't have to master Blender. I would suggest that if they (the childern) are intelligent enough to learn how to 3D print properly, that they are also intelligent enough to learn the basics of 3D design, I would go a step farther and say that they should be taught the basics of 3D design first, and that teaching 3D printing as anything other then an example of what can be done with their designs would be out of order.

The children would find themselves not understanding why they are getting poor results, why is one part of the model doing this and not the other, and why they can't have certain features, and understanding the reason for those features. The curriculum should be better thought out. We have many adults here who find themselves in that same situations daily. Perhaps the kids aren't ready UVW mapping yet.There are plenty of other fun and exciting things to be learned first.

You still have to learn how to use these tools. I'm not a Openscad or a Tinkercad user, I have taught classes with Blender before, basics through advanced. We once had a miscommunication with Autodesk about 8 seats of 3DSMax, and they were not available or installed at the time the class was scheduled, So, I had to teach the class in Blender, this ended up being appreciated by several of the students as they were able to go home and use the software to farther themselves. Blender can be as simple or as complex as you like, If your the instructor you can go through and configure Blender in the most simple of ways hiding all else so as not to distract.

From what I've been reading here on these forums Openscad and tinkercad certainly seem to have a place in the community, but if your moving on to Displacement maps, Bump maps, and Normals mapping, and the 3d program your using doesn't support these features or is lacking in their functionality, it's probably a sign that its time to move on.

 

 

Regards

 

Swiss_Cheese

 

P.s. Blender is not my Primary tool set, It is however very powerful if you need it to be.

 

 

 

The Filament Whisperer

Posted : 28/11/2021 9:39 pm
Netfool
(@netfool)
Active Member
RE:

@swiss_cheese

Well....     I understand your viewpoint.  But one of the chief advantages of something like TinkerCAD in K-6 education is that the kids can learn to create things without actually learning how to do 3D printing.  I know teachers to use it to teach basic concepts and then do the printing for their classes.  Seeing a third-grader light up when handed something she or he created in TinkerCAD is a heart-warming experience.    The single biggest failing of the U.S. education system is failing to engage students.  If you can keep students engaged, you'll create life-long learners.  In my opinion OpenSCAD is a valuable tool for teaching the fundamentals of co-ordinate systems, vectors, and geometry in K-12 math classes in a way that the math books when I took those classes totally failed to do.  (Full Disclosure:  That was 2/3 of a century ago).

 

This post was modified 7 months ago by Netfool
Posted : 29/11/2021 6:40 am
nw42
 nw42
(@nw42)
New Member
RE: Texture Feature

Would be nice to have a geometry displacement feature inside of Prusa Slicer because:
1. If you "bake" in the texture in your STL source it will get really big - in fact gigabytes of data per STL model instead of some KB
2. Pre-baking of displacement maps in a external DCC or CAD can significantly slow down the workflow  - but it will give you the last bit of control over all details.

so I think it would be handy to have this option also in the slicer...

Posted : 14/02/2022 7:18 pm
Yveske liked
towlerg
(@towlerg)
Noble Member
RE: Texture Feature

 

Posted by: @nw42

Would be nice to have a geometry displacement feature inside of Prusa Slicer because:
1. If you "bake" in the texture in your STL source it will get really big - in fact gigabytes of data per STL model instead of some KB
2. Pre-baking of displacement maps in a external DCC or CAD can significantly slow down the workflow  - but it will give you the last bit of control over all details.

so I think it would be handy to have this option also in the slicer...

Interesting point re. STL size. Seems like doing texture in the slicer does in fact make more sense.

Posted : 15/02/2022 2:29 pm
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